Collaboratory

Collaboratory Podcast explores co-creativity in action. Hosted by Dr Maya Haviland and Nicole Deen, the podcast draws on research and the experience of a range of practitioners to deepen and sustain our understanding of collaboration and co-creativity across cultures, communities and organisations.

Look for it on Apple Podcasts, Google and Spotify, find us on Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn or check out episodes and more below and on our blog.

For more info on the pod get in touch via collaboratorypodcast@gmail.

Skills for Co-Creative Relationships

Skills for Co-Creative Relationships

Collaboratory Season 1
Collaboratory Season 1
Skills for Co-Creative Relationships
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What are the skills and capabilities that are really important to facilitate co-creative processes? In this episode we hear thoughts on this question from a range of collaborative practitioners including three main guests David Lilley, Johanna De Ruyter and Callie Doyle Scott, who share insights from their diverse practice across theatre, business, social change and role play games. Topics we explore include:

  • The mindsets and attitudes conducive to collaborating effectively with others
  • What we can learn from tabletop role play game facilitation skills and improv theatre
  • The essential, but often overlooked, soft skills we need, such as listening and flexibility
  • How we can go about learning and practicing these skills and capabilities over time
  • What’s needed to build relationships that generate new, more imaginative, creative, innovative possibilities, actions or ideas or responses

Transcript

To ensure accessibility we are committed to providing transcripts of all our podcast episodes – you can read the full transcript here.


Resources

Reimagine STEM Podcast: Episode 1 Engineering Education for the Future

Reimagine STEM Podcast: “When a game means life or death”

Playback Theatre: “What is Playback Theatre?”

Creative Collaboration: Lessons from Improv Theater


Guests

Johanna de Ruyter is the founder of Moving Communication and co-founder of Wicked Elephants Coop. She integrates core practices and principles from improvisation, storytelling, and embodied language as developmental tools to enhance group connection and communication.  Collaboration is at the heart of the methodologies she embraces – how we listen and respond to ourselves, others and our world. 

You can find Johanna online on Wicked Elephants Coop, Moving Communication website and Medium  

David Lilley is undertaking a PhD in public health, public policy and urban environments at the University of New South Wales. He also works as a consultant with Collaboration for Impact, supporting mission and place-based initiatives involving community around Australia.  

You can find David online on Collaboration for Impact website and LinkedIn 

Callie Doyle-Scott is an independent writer, game maker and contributor to the College of Engineering and Computer Science inaugural CoDesign Culture Lab at the Australian National University. She has written articles for the Verity La and Writer’s Bloc webjournals. 

This episode also included guests: Natalie Barr, Dimitrios Papalexis, Anni Davey, Kim Cunio, Tirrania Suhood, Emma Blomkamp, Rebecca McNaught, Diana James, Johanna De Ruyter, Anni Doyle Wawrzynczak, Doyen Radcliffe, Sharon Babyack and Michelle Halse.

Get in touch

Email – collaboratorypodcast@gmail.com

Facebook – Collaboratory Podcast | Scaffolding Cultural CoCreativity

LinkedIn – Collaboratory Podcast

Instagram – @collaboratorypodcast

Collaboratory is written, edited and produced by Maya Haviland with production and editorial assistance from Nicole Deen. Audio engineering by Nick McCorriston. Music made especially for us by Seprock. Additional research and production support by Nicole O’Dowd.

Collaboratory is produced on the lands of the Ngunnawal, Ngunawal and Ngambri  people. We pay our respects, an ongoing gratitude to the custodian’s past present and future of the lands on which we work and of the knowledges from which we learn.



Collaboratory is a production of the Scaffolding Cultural Co-creativity Project hosted by the Center for Heritage and Museum Studies in the College of Arts and Social Sciences at the Australian National University funding is generously provided by the Australian National University Translational Fellowship Scheme.

Co-created Research: A Conversation with Kaira Zoe Cañete

Co-created Research: A Conversation with Kaira Zoe Cañete

Collaboratory Season 1
Collaboratory Season 1
Co-created Research: A Conversation with Kaira Zoe Cañete
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In this episode of the Collaboratory Conversation Series, Kaira Zoe Cañete shares reflections from her recent PhD research in the Philippines, and offers some practical advice on what it takes to co-create research that gives back to its participants rather than just extracting knowledge. 

In this edited conversation with Kaira, we explore:

  • How Kaira’s background influenced the approach she took to her research
  • The development and use of her photo-based research tool with women in urban communities in the Philippines following Typhoon Haiyan
  • How she approached and engaged with women as co-creative research participants
  • The complexities of sharing power and control in a research project
  • The importance of self-reflection and awareness as a researcher
  • The value of co-creative research for participants

While Kaira’s story focuses on academic research, the experiences and insights she shares are relevant for anyone wanting to engage authentically with community members to co-create something together.


Transcript

To ensure accessibility we are committed to providing transcripts of all our podcast episodes – you can read the full transcript here.


Resources

Alburo‐Cañete, Kaira Zoe. “PhotoKwento: co‐constructing women’s narratives of disaster recovery.” Disasters 45, no. 4 (2021): 887-912.  – Behind a pay wall

Alburo-Cañete, Kaira Zoe. “Benevolent discipline: governing affect in post-Yolanda disaster reconstruction in the Philippines.” Third World Quarterly 43, no. 3 (2022): 651-672. – Open Access

Alburo-Cañete, Kaira Zoe, et. Al. “(Dis) comfort, judgement and solidarity: affective politics of academic publishing in development studies – Open Access

Zoe Alburo-Cañete, Kaira. “Building back better? Rethinking gender and recovery in the time of COVID-19.” Global Social Policy 22, no. 1 (2022): 180-183. – Open Access


Guests

Kaira Zoe Cañete is a Filipino feminist scholar with training in Anthropology and Critical Development Studies. She specialises in gender, disasters, and development. She is currently a postdoctoral research fellow for the Humanitarian Governance Project at the International Institute of Social Studies, Erasmus University Rotterdam in the Netherlands. Her research interests include expanding/rethinking notions of disaster resilience, sustainability by centering perspectives of marginalised groups (the ‘vulnerable’) and advancing feminist ethics of care in disaster response and governance.

You can find Kaira online at Institute For Global Development UNSW Sydney websiteLinkedInResearch Gate

Get in touch

Email – collaboratorypodcast@gmail.com

Facebook – Collaboratory Podcast | Scaffolding Cultural CoCreativity

LinkedIn – Collaboratory Podcast

Instagram – @collaboratorypodcast

Collaboratory is written, edited and produced by Maya Haviland with production and editorial assistance from Nicole Deen. Audio engineering by Nick McCorriston. Music made especially for us by Seprock. Additional research and production support by Nicole O’Dowd.

Collaboratory is produced on the lands of the Ngunnawal, Ngunawal and Ngambri  people.We pay our respects, an ongoing gratitude to the custodian’s past present and future of the lands on which we work and of the knowledges from which we learn.



Collaboratory is a production of the Scaffolding Cultural Co-creativity Project hosted by the Center for Heritage and Museum Studies in the College of Arts and Social Sciences at the Australian National University funding is generously provided by the Australian National University Translational Fellowship Scheme.

Symbiosis as Co-Creativity

Symbiosis as Co-Creativity

Collaboratory Season 1
Collaboratory Season 1
Symbiosis as Co-Creativity
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In this episode of Collaboratory, Dr Maya Haviland talks with Professor Celeste Linde and Dr Merryn McKinnon about what the science of symbiosis, and fungi in particular, can teach us about the dynamics of co-creativity. Read the full show notes on our website scccp.net/collaboratory/


Transcript

To ensure accessibility we are committed to providing transcripts of all our podcast episodes – you can read the full transcript here.


Guests

Professor Celeste Linde is a researcher focused on fungal-plant-interactions. Her work includes both applied and pure research on a range of important pathogens as well as plant beneficial organisms such as mycorrhizal fungi. She is also interested in evolutionary aspects of plant-fungal-interactions, often utilising population genetic and phylogenetic tools to investigate fungal biology.

You can find Celeste online at Australian National University websiteResearch Gate

Dr Merryn McKinnon is a scientist and science communicator who designs and delivers science communication workshops, as well as workshops specifically for women in STEM. Her research explores why publics react and respond to scientific issues the way they do. She is actively building a research program exploring the influence of equity, inclusion and intersectionality in STEM, especially STEM communication. She regularly contributes to ABC Radio on ABC Sydney’s Nightlife and Radio National’s Research Filter, talking about interesting science from around the world.

You can find Merryn online at Australian National university websiteLinkedInTwitter


Resources

“Entangled Life: How Fungi make our worlds, change our minds and shape our futures “, Merlin Sheldrake, 2020, Bodley Head, London.

“Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest”, Suzanne Simard, 2021, Alfred A. Knopf, New York.

“Trees and fungi are the ultimate friends with benefits”, Gemma Conroy, ABC Science, 2 August, 2022.

“Do we need a new theory of evolution?”, Stephen Buranyi, The Guardian, 28 June, 2022.


Get in touch

Email – collaboratorypodcast@gmail.com

Facebook – Collaboratory Podcast | Scaffolding Cultural CoCreativity

LinkedIn – Collaboratory Podcast

Instagram – @collaboratorypodcast

Collaboratory is written, edited and produced by Maya Haviland with production and editorial assistance from Nicole Deen. Audio engineering by Nick McCorriston. Music made especially for us by Seprock. Additional research and production support by Nicole O’Dowd.

Collaboratory is produced on the lands of the Ngunnawal, Ngunawal and Ngambri  people.We pay our respects, an ongoing gratitude to the custodian’s past present and future of the lands on which we work and of the knowledges from which we learn.


Collaboratory is a production of the Scaffolding Cultural Co-creativity Project hosted by the Center for Heritage and Museum Studies in the College of Arts and Social Sciences at the Australian National University funding is generously provided by the Australian National University Translational Fellowship Scheme.

A Conversation with Jenni Savigny & Stephen Corey: Digital Storytelling

A Conversation with Jenni Savigny & Stephen Corey: Digital Storytelling

Collaboratory Season 1
Collaboratory Season 1
A Conversation with Jenni Savigny & Stephen Corey: Digital Storytelling
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In this episode of Collaboratory Conversations, we hear from Artistic Director of Gen S Stories, Jenni Savigny and her collaborator Stephen Corey, as they share their experiences supporting non-professional storytellers to create personal digital stories as a form of community development and living social history. Read the full show notes on our website scccp.net/collaboratory/

This conversation is an edited version of a live recording made at the ACT Heritage Library in Canberra, Australia in 2021, on the occasion of an exhibition called “The Art of the Story Circle”, which celebrated 10 years of collaborative storytelling with communities through Gen S Stories.


Transcript

To ensure accessibility we are committed to providing transcripts of all our podcast episodes – you can read the full transcript here.


Guests

Jenni Savigny is the Artistic Director of Gen S Stories and has made a professional practice as a digital storytelling facilitator, encompassing 10 years of programs with a wide variety of community organisations.

You can find Jenni online on the Gen S Stories websiteFacebook

Stephen Corey is a Canberra photographer and also tutors at the Canberra Institute of Technology Photography department and CIT Solutions.

You can find Stephen online on the Creaking Door Photography website

Get in touch

Email – collaboratorypodcast@gmail.com

Facebook – Collaboratory Podcast | Scaffolding Cultural CoCreativity

LinkedIn – Collaboratory Podcast

Instagram – @collaboratorypodcast

Collaboratory is written, edited and produced by Maya Haviland with production and editorial assistance from Nicole Deen. Audio engineering by Nick McCorriston. Music made especially for us by Seprock. Additional research and production support by Nicole O’Dowd.

Collaboratory is produced on the lands of the Ngunnawal, Ngunawal and Ngambri  people.We pay our respects, an ongoing gratitude to the custodian’s past present and future of the lands on which we work and of the knowledges from which we learn.


Collaboratory is a production of the Scaffolding Cultural Co-creativity Project hosted by the Center for Heritage and Museum Studies in the College of Arts and Social Sciences at the Australian National University funding is generously provided by the Australian National University Translational Fellowship Scheme.

Building Trusting Relationships

Building Trusting Relationships

Collaboratory Season 1
Collaboratory Season 1
Building Trusting Relationships
/

Trust and the relationships from which trust stems are critical foundations to co-creative processes. Whether making theatre shows, or trying to pass legislation across political divides, trusting relationships between people involved in any collaborative enterprise is an important ingredient to getting things done. In this episode, we hear from several people who have firsthand experience fostering trusting relationships for very different types of co-creative enterprises. Read the full show notes on our website scccp.net/collaboratory/

This episode features guests, Ali Clinch, Robin Davidson, Natalie Barr, Aruna Venkatachalam, and Anni Doyle Wawrzynczak.


Transcript

To ensure accessibility we are committed to providing transcripts of all our podcast episodes – you can read the full transcript here.


Interested in more?

We have a growing list of blogposts and other resources on the Collaboratory Podcast blog page.

Guests

Ali Clinch is an Artist and Creative Programs Manager at Rebus Theatre. She is an award-winning practitioner in Applied Theatre, the application of performing arts for social change and the Artistic Director for ‘Acting With Ali’.

You can find Ali online on Acting With Ali websiteRebus Theatre website

Robin Davidson is the founding and Artistic Director of Rebus Theatre and Workplace Training, a Canberra-based mixed ability theatre for social change company. He is also an actor, clown, director, teacher and writer.

You can find Robin online on Rebus Theatre website

Natalie Barr is an experienced and strategic leader, with expertise in building high performing teams and a passion for social policy. She has wide ranging experience across political offices, universities and government, specifically in strategic policy development, project management, communications and stakeholder engagement.

You can find Natalie online at Australian National University websiteLinkedIn

Aruna Venkatachalam is the General Manager, Partnerships and International at Young Change Agents. She has worked in international community development, commercial leadership development and social enterprise for 15 years. Aruna spent four years in India, Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka where she capacity-built local community organisations, social entrepreneurs, STEM professionals and students by providing training, frameworks, mentorship and connections in design thinking and best-practice community development.

You can find Aruna online at Young Change Agents websiteLinkedIn

Dr Anni Doyle Wawrzynczak is a Master Practitioner in collaborative arts practices, an independent curator, arts writer, facilitator, mentor, stage manager, and the author of “How Local Art made Australia’s National Capital”, ANU Press, 2020.

You can find Anni online on TwitterInstagramLinkedInANU Press

Get in touch

Email – collaboratorypodcast@gmail.com

Facebook – Collaboratory Podcast | Scaffolding Cultural CoCreativity

LinkedIn – Collaboratory Podcast

Instagram – @collaboratorypodcast

Collaboratory is written, edited and produced by Maya Haviland with production and editorial assistance from Nicole Deen. Audio engineering by Nick McCorriston. Music made especially for us by Seprock. Additional research and production support by Nicole O’Dowd.

Collaboratory is produced on the lands of the Ngunnawal, Ngunawal and Ngambri people.We pay our respects, an ongoing gratitude to the custodian’s past present and future of the lands on which we work and of the knowledges from which we learn.


Collaboratory is a production of the Scaffolding Cultural Co-creativity Project hosted by the Center for Heritage and Museum Studies in the College of Arts and Social Sciences at the Australian National University funding is generously provided by the Australian National University Translational Fellowship Scheme.

Intellectual Property and Agreements: A Conversation with Dr Diana James

Intellectual Property and Agreements: A Conversation with Dr Diana James

Collaboratory Season 1
Collaboratory Season 1
Intellectual Property and Agreements: A Conversation with Dr Diana James
/

In this episode, Dr Diana James shares some of her early experiences of cultural co-creativity and the relationships and learning which laid important foundations for the Songlines: Tracking the Seven Sisters exhibition to take place. She reflects on some of the back-end and relational structures that underpin the work that got presented in the exhibition and shares practical insights about tools and approaches to navigating value and agency across the intercultural and cross institutional spaces of a project like Songlines. Read the full show notes on our website scccp.net/collaboratory/


Transcript

To ensure accessibility we are committed to providing transcripts of all our podcast episodes – you can read the full transcript here.

Resources

Kungkarangkalpa: Seven Sisters Songline – Open Access

Seven Sisters Songline Kungkarangkalpa Performance, Canberra 2013 – Open Access

Songlines: Tracking the Seven Sisters, The National Museum of Australia – Open Access


Guests

Dr Diana James is an Honorary Research Fellow at the School of Humanities and Arts at the Australian National University and the Centre for Aboriginal Studies in Music at Adelaide University. Her research focus is the Indigenous song, story and dance of the Western Desert. 

You can find Diana online on Australian National University website, Kungkarangkalpa: Seven Sisters Songline


Get in touch

Email – collaboratorypodcast@gmail.com

Facebook – Collaboratory Podcast | Scaffolding Cultural CoCreativity

LinkedIn – Collaboratory Podcast

Instagram – @collaboratorypodcast


Collaboratory is written, edited and produced by Maya Haviland with production and editorial assistance from Nicole Deen. Audio engineering by Nick McCorriston.Music made, especially for us by Seprock, additional research and production support by Nicole O’Dowd.

Collaboratory is produced on the lands of the Ngunnawal, Ngunawal and Ngambri  people. We pay our respects, an ongoing gratitude to the custodian’s past present and future of the lands on which we work and of the knowledges from which we learn.

Collaboratory is a production of the Scaffolding Cultural Co-creativity Project hosted by the Center for Heritage and Museum Studies in the College of Arts and Social Sciences at the Australian National University funding is generously provided by the Australian National University Translational Fellowship Scheme.